Excited to Fly

Excited to Fly

Children of all ages enjoy flying.  During our Airplane showcase, kids of all ages can get up ...

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Lee Peterson Marquart Charger MA-5

Lee Peterson Marquart Charger MA-5

Lee Peterson owns the Marquart Charger MA-5 aerobatic biplane. The swept-wing open-cockpit Charger ...

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Addison Pemberton 40C

Addison Pemberton 40C

Pemberton and Sons Aviation of Spokane  restored a 1928 Boeing 40C, flying it for the first time ...

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Charlie McAllister

Charlie McAllister

Charlie McAllister’s Start Charlie and Alister McAllister acquired and rebuilt their first ...

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Young Eagles

Young Eagles

Many Young Eagles have taken their first flight at the McAllister Museum during our EAA Young ...

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AIRCRAFT SHOWCASE

A relatively rare variant of the de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver is scheduled to be featured Saturday (Aug. 1) in our annual “unique airplane presentations and flying demonstrations” series.

This Beaver is part of the Historic Flight Foundation collection at Paine Field in Snohomish County. While many Beavers continue to fly commercial and private missions, this is one of a handful restored to its original military specifications, according to HFF.

HFF’s Beaver, designated L-20A by the U.S. military, was delivered to the Air Force in 1960 and was sold to the British Army Air Corps in 1961. There it flew for three decades before being decommissioned.

British Airways and Seaflite Ltd. owned the aircraft before it was sold to a collector. In 2006, friends of Historic Flight noticed it in a bog in Scotland with the wings detached. It became airworthy again after two years of restoration.

This Beaver, serial number 1450, is presented in an Air Force arctic search and rescue paint scheme. Its conventional gear includes attach points for retractable skis.

Showcase presentations are scheduled to start at 10 a.m. and conclude by about noon. They begin with pilots giving a short talk about their planes, with spectators behind a rope crowd line, in keeping with Transportation Security Administration regulations. After pilots make a short demonstration flight, the rope line will be moved and spectators will be allowed to look at the planes up close and talk to the pilots.

There is no admission charge for the showcases or to the museum, but we appreciate donations.Beaver pic3